Aizoon Aizoacea - Care And Growing Problems

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Aizoon Aizoacea - Care And Growing Problems
Aizoon Aizoacea - Care And Growing Problems
Video: Aizoon Aizoacea - Care And Growing Problems
Video: Conophytums in collection May 2013 2023, February
Anonim
Fritia
Fritia
Conophytum
Conophytum
Faucaria
Faucaria
Lithops
Lithops

This vast family of leafy succulents includes plants of a wide variety of species and forms, common in the desert rocky areas of America, Asia, Australia, Africa. But the very name of the family (you can also find another - Aizaceae), unlike the well-known aroid or Gesneriaceae, is not heard by a simple lover of indoor plants. However, it is to the representatives of this family that the currently fashionable "living stones" crumbs belong.

Aizoon such as delosperma, lithops, conophytum, mesembriantemum, faucaria, fritium, trichodiadema, etc. have become widespread in culture.

Aizoon care

  • A lot of sunlight at any time of the year, however, after a cloudy winter, they gradually accustom themselves to the spring sun so as not to get burned.
  • Cool wintering between 10 and 15 ° C.
  • The dormant period is accompanied by the cessation of watering and a decrease in temperature.
  • Gentle watering, almost all the time of the growing period is very moderate, the ground should be slightly damp after watering and dry well before the next watering.
  • Transplant only as the pots are filled with overgrown roots.
  • The soil, as a rule, should consist of 1 part of good sod land, 1 part of coarse river sand and 1 part of brick chips or small pebbles.
  • Fine river sand is not suitable for succulents - over time it is compressed, cemented, there is no access to air for the roots, the soil dries slowly - this contributes to root rot. Therefore, only coarse sand with a fraction of about 2-4 mm is suitable for the soil.
  • After transplanting Aizoon, they do not need to be watered for several days, since the delicate roots could be damaged and easily rot.
  • Top dressing is permissible only during the growing season if the plant has not been transplanted for more than two years. Fertilizer is diluted at half the recommended concentration and applied once a month.

Problems of growing aizoon

  • Light brown wrinkled spots appear on "living stones" - sunburn from too bright spring sun. If the plant did not stand in the sun in winter or the winter was very cloudy, then the "stones" are gradually accustomed to the spring sun, using light shading in the form of a piece of tulle or gauze, which is gradually left for an increasingly shorter period.
  • Leaves do not grow or grow too slowly - perhaps the roots have filled the entire pot and a transplant is needed. If the transplant was carried out only a year ago, then the soil mixture may not be correctly selected or the plants do not have enough nutrients in the soil, you need to feed.
  • A new pair of leaves has appeared, but the old leaves do not die off, but are the same green - this can happen if watering is started too early, before the end of the dormant period. Watering can only begin when the old leaves wrinkle and begin to dry out.
  • The leaves are too elongated, and flowering does not begin - if it is too dark - the natural conditions of the Aizoon suggest maximum sunlight.
  • The leaves soften and turn black - if rotting has begun from excessive watering. If decay appears only on the leaf, then you can try to save the plant by cutting out the blackened part and sprinkling the cut with crushed coal. If signs of flooding (wrinkling, lethargy and softness, not associated with the natural death of leaves) are found throughout the plant, then most likely the roots are flooded. You need to get the plant out of the pot. If not all roots have suffered (rotted), then you can try to save the plant. It is necessary to rinse, cut off all the blackened parts of the roots and dry them in the air, plant in new dry soil, dusting with root. Do not water for a week after transplanting.

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