Gallic Nematoda, Stem, Leaf - Description, Signs, Control Measures

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Gallic Nematoda, Stem, Leaf - Description, Signs, Control Measures
Gallic Nematoda, Stem, Leaf - Description, Signs, Control Measures
Video: Gallic Nematoda, Stem, Leaf - Description, Signs, Control Measures
Video: How nematodes damage plants. 2023, February
Anonim

Root nematode

Or the rootworm nematode of the genus Meloidogyne is a serious pest of many indoor plants, fortunately it is not often found. The larva of the worm, penetrating into the tissue of the roots, by the release of specific enzymes causes the formation of swellings - gall. They can be the size of a grain of wheat or a walnut. Nematodes are small, colorless worms with a filamentous body up to 1.5 mm long. The cycle of development of a nematode from an egg is about 25-30 days, so the pest quickly spreads in the soil. Plants damaged by a nematode first stop growing, then turn yellow, dry out and die. Galls are composed of loose tissue, which is easily destroyed and entails rotting of the entire root. Even small damage caused by a nematode on the roots promotes the penetration of pathogenic bacteria and fungi and viruses into the tissues.

Nematoda photo

leaf nematode
leaf nematode
nematode photo
nematode photo
rootworm nematode
rootworm nematode
root nematode
root nematode
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nematode
nematode
nematode

Leaf nematode

The worm - the causative agent of the genus Aphelenchoides - is a microscopic worm, colorless up to 1 mm long, moving quickly. In places of damage to the leaf tissue, discoloration is formed and yellowish spots translucent to light are formed. When damaged by a leaf nematode, the leaf becomes thinner, in places like parchment. At first glance, the lesions are very similar to a bacterial disease, as dry, necrotic spots of irregular shape can appear. Over time, diseased leaves turn brown, dry out or rot. The plant dies.

Infection occurs from one plant to another. The settlement of nematodes is facilitated by water, soil transferred from infected places, in which the larvae can stay for many months, even at sub-zero temperatures.

Stem nematode

Worms of the genus Ditylenchus are small filamentous worms up to 1.7 mm long and are a serious pest of flower crops. It affects not only the stems, but also flowers and leaves. Nematodes adapt to parasitize on certain types of plants and do not pass to representatives of another species. Most often, hyacinths, phloxes, tulips, carnations, begonias, etc. are sick.

Penetrating from the soil through the roots, the stem nematode larvae penetrate the tissue of leaves and stems. Unlike leaf nematodes, stem nematodes cause tissue thickening in affected areas. Plants are distinguished by the ugly development of the stems of leaves and flowers. Shoots are shortened and in places have swellings. The affected parts have an unnaturally pale color, and over time they turn brown and die off.

Nematode control measures

It is very difficult to deal with an already infected plant, sometimes impossible. There are drugs against nematodes - nematicides, this is a very toxic group of pesticides, their use is unjustified at home, they are not produced for private households, only for use in agriculture.

Therefore, if you show signs of a nematode, it is better to destroy the plants along with the pot. But you can prevent nematode infection by sterilizing the ground before planting. To do this, steam the soil in the microwave: 1 liter of earth for about 3 minutes at a power of 900 watts. Can be baked in the oven - sprinkle evenly on a baking sheet, keep in a preheated oven for about 20 minutes. Scald the pots with boiling water. Disinfect shelves, window sills, glass and equipment with hot water.

Do not throw infected plants outside or in the compost heap.

How to get rid of a nematode

Severina: Signs of a nematode on houseplants: vitreous discharge on leaves turning brown, leaves falling off.

  • From the moment the leaves clearly affected by the worm appear on the plants, and as long as they appear, such leaves should be cut off.
  • Infected leaves must be destroyed immediately after cutting.
  • Watering should be done in such a way that the root system is moistened, and not the aerial part of the plant, because in this case there is a massive release of the nematode outside.
  • Move away from other plants.

Severin: If root and root nematodes are found, weakly affected plants can be shed 1-2 times under the root with a liquid preparation of pyrantel (1 division of a beaker per 1 liter of water), which is effective against round worms. With a solution of Decaris or levamisal hydrochloride (sold in pharmacies), 1 tablet per 1-2 liters of water to shed the plant. The treatment should be repeated after 2-3 weeks. In the same solution, you can hold the roots of the affected plant. But I would have shed for the prevention of those who stood nearby, and the affected plant itself is out! And farther and faster! It's not as funny and safe as it seems, you can infect other plants very quickly. It can be through the soil or plant care items.

Nicolas: Humus is a special medicine for most plants. Soil fertility indicator. And its producers are worms. There is a wolf in the forest, and a worm in the soil. Favorite delicacy for the worm is nematode (caviar). I agree that not all plants are suitable, do not rush to get rid of the earthworm.

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