Garden Pests On Indoor Plants

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Garden Pests On Indoor Plants
Garden Pests On Indoor Plants
Video: Garden Pests On Indoor Plants
Video: Houseplant pests: treating aphids, mealybugs, scale, thrips, whiteflies, and spider mites 2023, February
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This section describes random houseplant pests. They can appear if the plant is taken out into the garden or on an open veranda. When moving a plant from the street, you need to inspect it, since pests such as slugs, weevils, caterpillars and others can be detected, if any, by looking under the leaves. If the plant was brought into the house and after a while the plant began to lag behind in growth, wither, or eaten areas of stems, leaves and flowers began to appear, then it is worth checking it for pests. Moreover, if there is no pest on the aerial parts of the plant, then it is possible that it is hiding in the roots. Therefore, you need to get the plant out of the pot and examine the roots.

Caterpillars

These are mainly garden pests, sometimes they get on indoor plants if the flowers are put out in the garden for the summer. Caterpillars fall from trees or bushes under the window. A sure sign of their appearance is the eaten holes in the leaves. In the photo, the leafworm caterpillar, in addition to gnawing the edges of the leaves, weaved a web and blinded branches and leaves, later a cocoon will be woven from the web, where the caterpillar will begin to turn into a butterfly.

During the day, the earwig hides under the leaves, in the ovaries of flowers, and at night it crawls out, eats leaves and young shoots, so carefully examine all the secluded places on the flowers and take away insects.

caterpillar
caterpillar
caterpillar
caterpillar

Control measures. Manually pick pests from plants. As a prophylaxis, insecticide spraying can be done, but if the plant is outdoors, the chemicals are quickly washed off. Caterpillars devour the leaves of plants, but it is not difficult to get rid of them, it is enough to wipe the leaves with a sponge, remove all the cobwebs and insects.

Intavir helps well from leaf-eating. Unfortunately, pesticides only work on young caterpillars.

Centipedes

These whitish or dark brown, caterpillar-like insects with multiple legs can harm houseplants in the garden for the summer. They fall into flower pots with soil from the garden, sometimes with purchased land. Centipedes eat up the roots of plants and the lower leaves, as evidenced by the eaten away places in healthy plant tissues. Some types of millipedes are harmless, but unpleasant, even disgusting - they do not harm plants, but I would like to get rid of them.

centipedes
centipedes
centipedes
centipedes

Control measures. Drying the soil surface in a pot, sprinkling the soil with dry sand, ash can be used. Centipedes hide in dark and humid places, so you can detect and collect pests by placing a wooden plank, a small piece of linoleum, a circle of cucumber or zucchini on the soil near the plant. Centipedes will crawl under such a trap, from where they can be caught with your hands and thrown away.

Enkhitrei

These insects, similar to small white worms (about 1 cm long), can be seen if the plant is removed from the pot. Enchitrea is an excellent food for aquarium fish, for plants they are considered, in general, harmless, as they feed primarily on dead plant tissues. Enkhitrei is a signal that a swamp has been planted in the pot, the plant is waterlogged, roots rot from excessive watering - they are eaten by enkhitrei. As a result, the plant is inhibited and stunted, dying rather from overflow than from white worms.

enchitrea
enchitrea
enchitrea
enchitrea

Control measures. If these pests are found, you need to rinse the roots from the old soil and plant the plant in fresh soil. If the plant cannot be transplanted for any reason, then you need to water the soil with an insecticide solution. And gently loosen the soil. If such white worms appear in flower pots, think, perhaps, you are watering the flowers too much! Enchitrea are usually applied with organic fertilizers or garden soil. But if watering is not too frequent, the worms dry up and die.

Weevil

The weevil is a garden pest, but sometimes it gets along with the soil to indoor flowers. Most often it affects primroses and cyclamens. However, any plant exposed to the garden for the summer can become the subject of an attack by a weevil.

The beetles eat the leaves, leaving holes in them, like the Colorado potato beetle. Adult weevil beetles are clearly visible on the plant - black, large, with long antennae. But the real harm is brought by the larvae, 1 cm long, cream-colored, which the female lays in the soil. The larvae live in the ground and devour roots, bulbs, tubers. If the pest is not detected during the time, the roots will be completely eaten and the plant will die.

weevil
weevil
weevil
weevil

Control measures. If the root system has not yet been eaten completely, i.e. the plant has just begun to wilt, then water the soil with a systemic insecticide (fufan, inta-vir, etc.) and treat the leaves. But it is better, without resorting to chemicals, to transplant the plant into fresh soil.

It helps to cope with the scourge of replanting with land replacement and adding basudin to the soil - for newly purchased plants (especially greenhouse and greenhouse plants), as well as watering the soil with insecticides if the plant does not tolerate transplanting well.

Woodlice

This representative of the crustacean family has gills located on the abdomen, which need constant moisture, so wood lice grow in a very wet substrate, in drain pallets, flower boxes. Woodlice are active only in the dark, they eat the juicy parts of plants. The wood louse has a segmented oval body of gray or brown color, the segments of which are soft from the side of the abdomen and hard from above, as if covered with a shell. Two long antennae in front. Sizes about 5-10 mm. Paws 5 pairs or more are visible from the abdomen.

Signs of woodlice in indoor flowers - when small piles of earth appear on the pallet. You may not see woodlice themselves - they hide in the ground. Woodlice grow in leafy soil rich in organic matter, and also come from purchased land. Therefore, it is always recommended to sterilize the soil before transplanting. The harm from wood lice is that they compact the soil, nailing it with their carapace body. If earthworms pass the soil through themselves and loosen it, then the wood louse acts like a crush. As a result, oxygen access to the roots decreases, they suffocate.

wood lice
wood lice
wood lice
wood lice

Control measures. Drying the soil surface in a pot, collecting pests by hand. In the garden, this method helps to fight woodlice. Planks or damp rags are placed between the ridges, in the morning the pests hide under the boards or rags, then they can be collected. Usually, adjusting the soil moisture level is sufficient to exterminate woodlice.

Tips from the forum:

Acanta: I bought a maidenhair bush in a city greenhouse. And I found wood lice in a pot. Initially, I hoped that by drowning the bush head over heels, I could collect the emerging animals. But it turned out - they don't float! I had to replant the whole plant.

Severina: Spill acarinum, it helps against wood lice.

Earla: I don't want to use chemicals again. My advice: take a potato, hollow it out from the inside, place it in a pot next to the plant, and all the wood lice will collect in it. Then throw out the potato along with the pests. Instead of potatoes, you can put a lump of sphagnum moss on the surface of the ground, it should be slightly damp. Woodlice will climb into it and the moss can be thrown away.

Lacewing

The lacewing is not a pest! She is the savior of the garden and home flowers from pests.

The lacewing is mistaken for a pest, as this insect lays eggs on the underside of the leaf. In fact, the larvae of some species of lacewings feed on pests of indoor flowers - aphids, thrips, as well as whiteflies, spider mites, mealybugs. They are very similar to the larvae of a ladybug - with an elongated body, three pairs of legs and powerful jaws.

lacewing
lacewing
lacewing
lacewing
ladybug larva
ladybug larva
lacewing larva
lacewing larva

Often, lacewings fly onto balcony plants, hiding from the weather, i.e. not necessarily on plants heavily affected by indoor plant pests. However, the sight of oviposited plant leaves is also not pleasant.

The larvae of the lacewing, like the larvae of the ladybug, are harmless to plants - they eat aphids, ticks and other herbivorous insects.

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